Aug

21

2018

Your journal needs you!

AudioWings is the member’s journal of the Australian Wildlife Sound Recording Group. With it, we aim to improve the skill base of members with respect to sound recording techniques, sound analysis and archiving of your sounds. We also aim to facilitate information sharing among the community of sound recordists.

The AudioWings editorial team has been working on improving the quality of the journal. With this in mind we have updated the Style Guidelines, both to improve the look of the journal, and to make the guidelines simple for contributors to follow.

We welcome ANY contributions relating to sound recording including: observations and analysis of sound recordings, book reviews, equipment reviews, trip reports, profiles of sound recordists and any novel techniques you may have developed.

Southern Royal Albatross pleading for copy (Photo: Sue Gould)

Jun

19

2018

BBC Radio 4 explores birdsong

The curious cases of Rutherford and Fry is a BBC Radio program in which two scientists explore topics nominated by listeners. This fun program was initiated by a question from a listener in Cambridgeshire who asked “Winter is finally over and the birds are all singing their hearts out at dawn. What’s all the noise about? And why are some songs so elaborate?” The program covers a range of topics about birdsong. It includes a short interview with renowned birdsong researcher Don Kroodsma.

You can download the podcast here.

May

11

2018

The Dance of a Newly Discovered Bird-of-Paradise

Differences in vocalisations are increasingly being investigated as to whether they indicate hitherto unrecognised new species. In this case, the visual display is just as significant. And amazing.

I can imagine how many hours went into locating and filming these birds to capture the high-resolution images and audio on this video. That it is such an iconic bird makes me wonder how many other discoveries await patient naturalists and sound recordists.

Click here for the full research paper. Thanks to Tony Baylis for alerting us to this new research.

Apr

27

2018

Here’s the buzz on recording bees!

by Vicki Powys

I knew about buzz pollination from watching David Attenborough’s Life of Insects on TV a few years ago. Some bees could buzz at a certain pitch to release pollen from certain flowers. “Middle C…”, said David Attenborough, “…the pitch has to be Middle C”. I was intrigued as I’d never heard about this before.

Then one spring morning in 2016, on my woodland property in Capertee Valley, New South Wales, yellow guinea flowers began to bloom and I could hear the conspicuous flight hum of a very large and shiny black bee. It buzzed loudly as it settled on each flower, before zooming off to the next one. This was a female Australian carpenter bee Xylocopa aeratus, and I was keen to get a photo and to record its buzz.

Female carpenter bee Xylocopa aeratus buzzing a guinea flower Hibbertia obtusifolia, Capertee Valley NSW, 8 November 2016.

I waited amidst the low-growing guinea flower shrubs, seated on a folding stool, camera and recorder at the ready. It became a daily ritual – at dawn each day I’d go off to watch bees buzzing. As well as the big, black carpenter bees there were also smaller native bees, all buzzing the guinea flowers and collecting pollen. I took photos and made videos with my Lumix pocket camera, and recorded the buzzing sounds on my Olympus LS10, using its built-in mics or a Sennheiser ME66 gun microphone.

My bee recording kit – folding stool, Lumix DCM-TZ60 camera, Olympus LS10 audio recorder and Sennheiser ME66 supercardoid microphone in pistol grip.

Of course I was keen to know if all my bees buzzed at Middle C, so I analyzed the recordings to find the fundamental pitch of the pollination buzz for each bee species. For this I downloaded free Praat software, and learned how to use it from a YouTube video.

My findings were exciting! These Capertee Valley bees buzzed at a wide range of frequencies – up to one octave either side of Middle C! The pitch of the buzz did not relate to the size of the bee, nor to the size of the flower.

Audio: Female carpenter bee, Xylocopa aeratus. The higher-pitched pollination buzz alternates with the flight hum.
30 October 2016, 7.19 am EST, ME66 gun mic to Olympus LS10.

Click here to read more about this project on my website

Apr

7

2018

Join us! – Ecoacoustics Congress, Brisbane, June 2018

How can sound deepen our understanding of the environment? What role can acoustic monitoring play in helping identify the presence of animals in a habitat? What indications of ecosystem health may analysis of soundscapes offer? And how can artists and musicians respond to the natural environment and scientific data through creative engagement?

These questions and more will bring researchers and artists from the world to Brisbane this June for the biennial Ecoacoustics Congress.

Ecoacoustics Congress, Brisbane June 2018

more »

Mar

23

2018

Is Birdsong Music? – book & CD reviews by Michael Hannan

AWSRG member Michael Hannan has written two reviews of recent publications by zoomusicologist, composer, violinist (and fellow AWSRG member), Hollis Taylor.

Hollis’s work presents insights and responses to the songs of Pied Butcherbirds, and essentially poses the question; do birds display a sense of aesthetics? It is an intriguing question!

Click here for Michael’s review of Hollis’s book, ‘Is Birdsong Music?

and here for his other review of her accompanying double CD of compositions and field recordings; ‘Absolute Bird’.

Michael himself is a composer and performer, and had one of his pieces premiered at our recent conference by clarinetist Vicki Hallett (which can be heard here – scroll down to audio file #19)

Mar

13

2018

Is birdsong music?

Birdsong is often exquisitely beautiful, yet many people argue that it is purely functional. It certainly enables birds to attract mates, declare their territories and communicate with individuals of their own species. Musicologist and composer, Hollis Taylor, has spent many years closely studying the songs of pied butcherbirds.

Hollis Taylor

In this hour long episode of the Science Show broadcast recently on ABC Radio National, Hollis outlines the case for birdsong as music.

Feb

20

2018

Vicki Hallett attends Sonic Mmabolela

In 2017, Australian composer and musician Vicki Hallett attended the 5th Sonic Mmabolela workshop. Sonic Mmabolela is a residency for sound artists and composers with previous experience in sound recording and experimentation. It is held annually at Mmabolela Reserve in the Limpopo valley of South Africa.

Click here to hear some of the compositions from Sonic Mmabolela 2017

Live at Mabolel Rock from Vicki Hallett on Vimeo.

Jan

28

2018

Presentations from the 2017 AWSRG Conference, Baradine

Each of the presentations at our 2017 conference were audio recorded as a document of the event, and are presented here in program order.

The acoustic in the room makes it difficult to hear at times, but hopefully the audio will be clear enough. Thanks to Bob Tomkins for making these recordings.

more »

Jan

26

2018

Is noise causing birds stress responses similar to PTSD?

New research gives pause for thought…

https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/speaking-of-science/wp/2018/01/09/some-birds-are-so-stressed-by-noise-pollution-it-looks-like-they-have-ptsd/?utm_term=.1816f166c00f