Archive for November, 2017

Nov

22

2017

Perspectives on Listening Symposium – Brisbane

Perspectives On Listening Symposium December 2017

December 7-9, 2017
​Queensland Conservatorium Griffith University, Brisbane

Biosphere Soundscapes and the Queensland Conservatorium Research Centre, Griffith University are hosting “Perspectives on Listening”, an international symposium and workshop bringing together an interdisciplinary group of researchers to explore the role of sound in understanding place and environmental changes.

“Perspectives on Listening” will introduce the interdisciplinary possibilities of acoustic ecology and highlight emerging fields including ecoacoustics. The event features keynotes from Steven Feld (USA) and Monica Gagliano (West Australia) in addition to panels, research presentations, live performances, immersive installations, sound walks and field trips across the rainforests of the Sunshine Coast and aquatic ecosystems in Noosa Biosphere Reserve.
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Nov

13

2017

Sound recording the cloudforests of Papua New Guinea’s Huon Peninsular

Five members from the AWSRG have recently been field recording in the mountain forests of the Huon Peninsular in Papua New Guinea.

With three previous years recording in the region, Tony Baylis organised and lead this year’s expedition, comprising Sue Gould and her partner Rod Thorn (who both accompanied Tony last year), plus David Stewart and myself, Andrew Skeoch.

On the trail in Papua New Guinea – (from left) Rod Thorn, David Stewart, Andrew Skeoch, Tony Baylis and Sue Gould.

Tony’s connections with the local people were crucial to the expedition. Without permission and support from local landholders we simply could not have visited these forests. We hired porters from nearby villages to assist in moving all our equipment and supplies between camps. Here they arrive at our first bush camp in the morning, ready to help us relocate further up the mountain.

Tony and Rod ascending slowly. Trekking was exhausting, a combination of altitude and a vertical landscape. Often a day’s walk with only modest altitude gains, would involve first descending into a deep valley and then climbing up a sheer slope beyond. The locals were adapted to it, padding along in bare feet, but slippery rocks, mud and hidden tree roots were treacherous in our hiking boots. We relied on our walking poles for both balance and secure footing.

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