Of interest




Is noise causing birds stress responses similar to PTSD?

New research gives pause for thought…





Chris Watson interview with Richard Fidler

Chris Watson, British wildlife sound recordist

For those of you who (like myself) missed it when first broadcast a few months ago, here is a link to the delightful interview by Richard Fidler with British field recordist Chris Watson.

Chris is not only a hugely accomplished recordist, but a great story teller and sensitive naturalist, and unlike many interviewers dealing with sound and nature, Richard ‘gets it’.





The forgotten songs of Sydney’s birdsong

forgotten birds

Forgotten Songs commemorates the songs of fifty birds once heard in central Sydney, before they were gradually forced out by European settlement. The calls, which filter down from the canopy of birdcages suspended above Angel Place, change as day shifts to night; the daytime birds’ songs disappearing with the sun, and those of the nocturnal birds, which inhabited the area, sounding into the evening.

This delightful installation was a collaboration between ecologists and sound artists, with the AWSRG’s Fred van Gessel providing the birdsong recordings.

This artwork was commissioned in 2009 and has now been retained as a permanent installation.

More info and images




Transforming climate change data into music

Ten years ago, old-school graphs and text-based data were the only way to communicate the growing problem of climate change. But when it comes to inspiring action, a relentless march of charts can disengage many. For Leah Borromeo, co-founder of Climate Symphony, it became clear a different approach was needed.

“Music makes us feel things,” she says. “It affects us physiologically, emotionally. Sound has always acted as a warning for us, we have this ingrained in our limbic system. This is a new way of expressing the climate change issue.”

Full article on wired.co

Climate Symphony